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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Comment

Posted in June 15th, 2014
Published in Asthma

Medication may influence symptoms and airway responsiveness. It has been shown that prolonged use of inhaled steroids may reduce airway responsiveness and “induce” remission in some subjects. In our study, only two subjects “in remission” previously took inhaled steroids or prednisone, most subjects using a /82-agonist on demand, in some of them in association with […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Conclusion

Posted in June 13th, 2014
Published in Asthma

More than 50 percent of subjects with mild increases in airway response to histamine denied symptoms suggestive of asthma. This is similar to what has been reported by Woolcock et al28 showing that 32 percent of adults with airway hyperresponsiveness never had symptoms suggestive of asthma. This suggests that for a similar degree of airway […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Discussion

Posted in June 11th, 2014
Published in Asthma

In our study, asthma remission occurred between ages 11 and 20 years in most subjects but remissions were also observed after the age of 40 years. Remissions in asthmatic children have been well studied but little is known, however, of asthma remissions in adults. Spontaneous remissions of asthma have been reported to occur in 30 […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Respiratory Symptoms

Posted in June 9th, 2014
Published in Asthma

On initial questionnaire, 29 asthmatics “in remission” (15 controls) described occasional respiratory symptoms following either allergen exposure (n=15, 6 controls), viral infections, or exposure to different conditions or stimuli (humidity, cold air, smoke, heavy exercise). During the 14-day period of PEFR measurement and symptoms recordings, 12 “ex-asthmatics” (one control) had symptoms such as either dyspnea, […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Response to Bronchodilators

Posted in June 7th, 2014
Published in Asthma

In asthmatics “in remission,” improvement in FEVi following bronchodilator was small although larger than in controls, with a percent change from baseline values ranging from —1.1 to 14.1 percent; mean, 5.7 ±0.8 percent (controls: —4.4 to 10.5 percent; mean, 2.5 ±0.6 percent; p=0.004). After 200 fig of inhaled albuterol, FEF25-75% increased 2.2 to 50 percent […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Results

Posted in June 5th, 2014
Published in Asthma

Results were similar whether the five hyperreactive subjects were replaced or not, except for bronchodilator response, as commented in this section. Therefore, the results presented are those of the 30 ex-asthmatics in comparison to the 30 initial controls, including these 5 hyperreactive subjects. Our subjects reported no symptom attributed to asthma or any need for […]

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Persistence of Airway Obstruction and Hyperresponsiveness in Subjects With Asthma Remission: Statistical Analysis

Posted in June 3rd, 2014
Published in Asthma

Study Design The subjects came to the laboratory on three different occasions. On the first visit, one of the investigators administered a questionnaire on the characteristics of their former asthma (duration, severity, medication requirements, potential initiating factors, time of asthma diagnosis and of remission, including last 2 years’ respiratory symptoms, and family history of asthma). […]

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