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Advair of Medstore Pharmacy Treats Breathing Problems

Published in Asthma

Advair of Medstore Pharmacy is known to contain salmeterol and fluticasone. Fluticasone is actually a steroid the helps in preventing the release of the substances in the body. Salmeterol on the other hand is a bronchodilator that works makes the muscles in the airways relax. This helps in bringing about an improvement in breathing.

The oral is used for treating the attacks of asthma. Advair is also used for preventing worsening of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease which is related to emphysema or chronic bronchitis and flare-ups. The medication has to be used on a regular basis for it to be effective. However, the medicine does not work right away and thus, should not be taken to treat sudden asthma attack or shortness of breath. If you want a medicine that works instantaneously then use a quick-relief inhaler like albuterol also known as salbutamol.

Asthma attack

What are the Possible Side Effects of Using Advair?

Side effects generally go away after you get used to the drug. Serious side effects of this medicine for asthma attack are very rare. The medicine is known to cause a rise in the blood pressure. Thus, you should check the blood pressure on a regular basis and inform the doctor when you notice it to be high. Some of the problems of the drugs from Medstore Pharmacy are:

  • Fever
  • Persistent sore throat
  • White patches in the mouth and tongue
  • Problem in sleeping
  • Mood and mental changes
  • Changes in vision
  • Shaking
  • Muscle cramps
  • Increase in thirst
  • Severe dizziness
  • Irregular or fast heartbeats
  • Fainting
  • Seizures

An allergic reaction to the drug is very uncommon but if you notice some serious reactions like itching and rash, you should immediate consult the doctor.

Advair

How to Take Advair?

Before you start taking the medicine for asthma attack, you need to read the guideline provided by the doctor or the pharmacist. Read the instruction the proper method of using the inhaler. The device has to be used in a flat level position. The medication has to be inhaled by mouth generally twice every day. However, there has to be a gap of about 12 hours. You may or may not be able to taste the drug when you inhale it. Take care not to inhale into the device.

The inhaler should not be taken apart. You should wash the mouthpiece or any other part of the inhaler. Make sure to close the device after every use. In case, you are using other inhaler, you need to wait at least a minute before using the second one. You should rinse the mouth with water after using the medication. This is good for the prevention of yeast infection and irritation in the throat and mouth. The dose of the medication is generally based on the age, medical condition, and the response that you have to the treatment.

Precautions to Take Before Using the Drug

You need to tell the doctor if you are allergic either of the two components of the drug. You need to inform the doctor if you have medical history of:

  • Osteoporosis
  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Overactive thyroid
  • Eye problems
  • Liver disease
  • Seizures
  • Past infections like herpes or tuberculosis

Reconcilable Differences: Conclusions

Published in Asthma

An assumption of this analysis is that the excessive use of SA P-agonists is synonymous with asthma control, an assumption that is supported by both the metrics of control included in the current asthma management guidelines and the Asthma Control Questionnaire, and expert opinion. These results are also dependent on the measurement and adjustment for asthma severity. The quantification of severity is complicated by the complex relationship between asthma severity and asthma control, and thus many of attributes deemed explanatory of asthma severity (eg, symptoms, pulmonary function, and morbidity) are also representative of asthma control. Although we agree with Cockroft and Swystyn that ideally asthma severity should be quantified based on the magnitude of treatment required to control symptoms, this was not possible due to the cross-sectional nature of our study. Therefore, it was necessary for us to adjust for asthma severity based on all proposed dimensions of asthma severity including symptoms, pulmonary function, morbidity, and controller medication use. Therefore, the only variable that can truly be used to quantify asthma control in this population is the magnitude of short-acting P agonist use. If adequately controlled, only the most severe, treatment recalcitrant asthmatics should be using more than four doses of short-acting P agonist per week independent of asthma severity. No participant in this study could be considered treatment resistant, and therefore short-acting P agonist use is a valid measure of treatment control in all study participants. Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences: Asthma control

Published in Asthma

Reconcilable Differences: Asthma controlConnolly et al reported poorer asthma control based on a greater reversibility of airway disease in men in lower social classes. The only studies to assess differential pharmacologic management are two US studies done in children and adolescents, both of which concluded that asthma management may be inadequate in lower social classes. The likelihood that different factors impact asthma control in children and adults prevents the direct extrapolation of these results to adult asthmatics. Furthermore, if access to health care is an important etiologic factor, class differences in access to health care between the US and Canada may mean a lesser likelihood of a social gradient in a Canadian population. The persistence of the association in individuals in our study receiving social assistance suggests that barriers to health care are not the primary etiologic factor in poorer management, given their receipt of essentially all asthma medications and health-care services at no charge. Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences: Discussion

Published in Asthma

Although there was no association between age, gender, or genotype and SA P-agonist use, we identified a strong and significant association between SES and the amount of SA P-agonist medications used by asthmatics, independent of asthma severity. This association was consistent across all proximate and contextual measures of SES, with gradients identified in the expected directions. This study provides the first evidence suggesting that poorer outcomes in lower SES asthmatics may not be associated solely with greater asthma severity as previously postulated, but rather also to poorer asthma control, despite universal access to health care. Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences: SA

Published in Asthma

Reconcilable Differences: SABoth annual household income and level of education completed were negatively and significantly associated with the magnitude of SA (3-agonist used, with a consistent gradient across social classes (Fig 2). Adjustment for family size based on the lowincome cutoff did not affect the results. Although the gradient based on education was consistent and the overall associations were significant (p 4 canisters of SA P-agonist in the previous year, and approximately a 35% reduction in the OR for having used > 12 canisters. Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences: CLDSI

Published in Asthma

This sample was well distributed across all levels of asthma severity (Table 2). All three severity scores were normally distributed across the entire range of the score, with the Ng Score encompassing its entire range, while the CLDSI and ASS ranged from 5 and 6 to 28, respectively. Table 2 also illustrates the construct validity of each severity score. According to the Canadian Asthma Guidelines, patients with moderate and severe asthma were significantly more likely to have used a greater amounts of SA P-agonists, whereas those with higher asthma severity scores (ie, less severe disease) were less likely to have used greater amounts of SA P-agonist. Furthermore, as postulated, having visited an emergency department or been hospitalized were also positively associated with SA P-agonist use, and the better one’s pulmonary function, the less likely they were to use greater amounts of SA P-agonist.
There was no significant association between age, gender, or genotype and the amount of a SA P-agonist used. Corticosteroid use, all indexes and dimensions of asthma severity, except having been hospitalized for asthma in the previous year, and all proximate and contextual measures of SES were significantly associated with SA P-agonist use. Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences: Results

Published in Asthma

Reconcilable Differences: ResultsThe proportional odds assumption was tested for each model using a Score test. If the hypothesis of proportional odds was rejected (p 4 canisters, or 12 canisters) are reported for each association. Continue reading this post…

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