Latest News - Part 6

Reconcilable Differences: Materials and Methods

Published in Asthma

Patient Recruitment and Study Sample
We performed a cross-sectional study of a sample of 202 English-speaking asthmatic patients between 19 years and 50 years of age residing in the Greater Vancouver Regional District of British Columbia (BC), Canada. One hundred nine subjects were recruited from a random sample of SA P-agonist users identified using the BC Ministry of Health Pharmacare database. Researchers were blinded to the identity of the every patient until the patient consented to participate, thereby protecting each patient’s privacy and ensuring confidentiality. Pharmacare is the pharmaceutical reimbursement program of BC, which provides comprehensive first-dollar coverage for all BC residents on social assistance (plan C), and the general population < 65 years of age (plan E) whose annual family pharmaceutical expenditure exceeds $800 per year. Ninety-three subjects were recruited through media advertising. A detailed description and evaluation of the recruiting method has been published elsewhere. Each subject was assessed in a pulmonary research clinic by trained personnel, and received $25 to defray travel expenses. The institutional and university ethics review boards approved the study protocol, and informed consent was obtained from each participant. buy wellbutrin online Continue reading this post…

Reconcilable Differences

Published in Asthma

Reconcilable DifferencesAn association between the excessive use of short-acting (SA) P-agonists and greater asthma-related morbidity and mortality has been identified, raising concerns over their safety. Specifically, asthmatic patients receiving excessive amounts of SA P-agonist experience more frequent emergency department visits, have a greater likelihood of a hospital admission and are at greater risk of having a fatal or near-fatal asthma exacerbation, independent of asthma severity. At least four prospective studies have also shown that the regular use of salbutamol and fenoterol is associated with poorer outcomes when compared to their use on an as-needed or rescue basis. buy starlix online
Current asthma management guidelines define good asthma control as requiring less than four doses (eight puffs) of a SA P-agonist per week. In two previous studies,” we identified a high prevalence of SA P-agonist use above this threshold, with little or no concomitant inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), suggesting suboptimal management. We therefore embarked on a study of factors related to the excessive use of SA ^-agonists. Continue reading this post…

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: Hospitals and Health-care IT Preparedness Planning

Published in Care

We suggest hospitals have a plan for rapid movement of the data center to offsite remote operations in the case of prolonged local power disruption for critical functions.
We suggest a plan be in place to provide power to the client machines, analyzers, networking equipment, etc along with the data center for an extended period of time.
We suggest hospitals plan around extended supply disruption of critical IT supplies, such as servers and disk drives. www.medicine-against-diabetes.net
When a disaster directly damages a hospital’s facilities, direct damages to the IT infrastructure are likely, as well as to local utility and transportation networks. Continuity of operations will require both onsite and offsite redundant systems. Hospitals are required to have 72 h of onsite power generation capability; however, although in an extended disaster this is insufficient, extended-capacity systems are not required by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health-Care Organizations and are unlikely to be installed because of current financial pressures on hospitals. If local transportation networks are affected, difficulties may occur in obtaining sufficient quantities of diesel fuel to run generators as well as transport fuel where it is needed.
Continue reading this post…

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: The information priorities

Published in Care

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: The information prioritiesFor these reasons, we strongly suggest setting up emergency networks that use consumer products, including laptop computers, “smart” cell phones, and electronic note pads, among others. The power of consumer mobile computing devices now rivals traditional desktop computers. They are ideal devices for use during mass casualty events because of high mobility and built-in network capability, low cost, and very low power usage. They are already owned and routinely used by most hospital staff and are quite rugged, surviving daily usage in unprotected settings. Although not traditionally managed by the hospital’s IT protocols, they are a large reservoir of readily available portable technology with low capital investment. best eye drops
The information priorities established by the task force under these circumstances are:
•    Have the necessary portable hardware and software functionality to store health information when hospital systems are unavailable, and being able to upload information when systems are again online.
•    Track basic patient information, including patient demographics with next of kin with contact information, and a defined minimal database of medical history that can be transferred with every patient to other points of care (see the “Evacuation of the ICU” article by King et al in this consensus statement).
Continue reading this post…

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: Functioning Information Network

Published in Care

Wireless local area networks are suggested, as they may be less vulnerable to damage, can be used for monitoring patients and for high-speed data applications (eg, picture archiving and communication system), and are capable of supporting most portable or handheld hardware (Fig 1). Cellular-based solutions maybe less preferred, as cellular networks are not available in all circumstances.
There are no ready-made disaster network solutions, but effective network communication systems have been implemented under actual disasters and in training exercises.’’’ An example implemented after the Haiti earthquake in 2010 was a field hospital that used laptop computers with a wireless local area network powered by gas generators, which was operational within 6 h after arrival; a wired network was added within 48 h and was capable of managing data-intensive applications, such as picture archiving and communication systems. Generators may maintain electrical power even under extreme circumstances, but plans for alternative power sources should include sufficient battery power, or possibly even solar power.
Continue reading this post…

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: Portable Mobile Support Information Networks

Published in Care

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: Portable Mobile Support Information NetworksWe suggest hospitals have the ability to effectively and quickly download all patient-related information into a mobile package (eg, a flash drive or disk) that can be easily read by other information systems, and can be rapidly prepared for transport with the patient. This should obey the clinical document architecture/continuity of care document documents currently specified under meaningful use proposals, making them both human and digitally readable.
We suggest hospitals have real-time connection to databases for uploading and downloading clinical information.
We suggest hospitals have the necessary IT functionality to store health information when hospital systems are not available, and be able to rapidly upload and download clinical information once connections are re-established.
We suggest hospitals have the means to ensure confidentiality of all patient protected information.
Continue reading this post…

Care of the Critically ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: Health Information Technology Continuity in Disasters

Published in Care

Strategy 5: Once an impending medication or supply shortage is identified, health-care facilities should institute protocols to encourage the use of alternative products whenever possible and to restrict use of the product in shortage such that it is only used when there is no available alternative or when the use of alternatives is prohibited due to substantial differences in efficacy or toxicity. www.medicine-against-diabetes.net
Strategy 6: Health-care facilities and the healthcare industry should support ongoing efforts from policy makers and national and international governmental and nongovernmental organizations to reduce supply chain vulnerability in medical supplies and medications. Interventions currently considered include requirement of early reporting of anticipated shortages or manufacturing difficulties, expedited review of alternative manufacturing processes, providing incentives to manufacturers to produce critical medical products, requiring regulatory approval for manufacturing redundancies in sourcing and production, and improving communication between manufacturers and regulatory authorities.
Continue reading this post…

Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 38 39 40 Next
About Cialis
myimg Tadalafil is an orally administered drug for treating impotence (erectile dysfunction), that initially was developed by the biotechnology company ICOS, and then developed and marketed world-wide as Cialis, by Lilly ICOS, LLC, the joint venture of ICOS Corporation and Eli Lilly and Company. Cialis tablets, in 5mg, 10mg, and 20mg doses, are yellow, film-coated, and almond-shaped.